A food allergy blog

Delicious Vegan Waffles

Delicious Vegan Waffles

Yeast-free, dairy-free, egg-free, nut-free

Recent Posts

Delicious Vegan Waffles

Delicious Vegan Waffles

Crispy on the outside and fluffy on the inside, these waffles are yeast-, dairy-, and egg-free and could easily be made gluten-free as well. They make a wonderful breakfast or dessert when dipped in chocolate.

Crispy Baked Pommes Frites

Crispy Baked Pommes Frites

Crispy golden brown on the outside with a light and airy, fluffy center, these baked french fries will satisfy any fry-lovers craving for fries.

Flying with Food Allergies + What Foods to Pack

Flying with Food Allergies + What Foods to Pack

It’s no secret that I love to travel. I’m lucky enough to be able to travel quite a bit thanks to a husband who also loves to travel and friends that live all over the world. But flying with food allergies isn’t always enjoyable.

We fly a lot of United, not because it is the best by any means, but because it is the most convenient for the majority of our destinations and we’ve racked up points and status. Therefore, all of my experiences have been with United, so please keep that in mind while reading through this post.

Since most of my food allergies are not severe, my issue is that there are so many to avoid. A few years ago I noticed that United started to put ingredient lists on nearly all of their food service items, not just prepackaged goods like the salad dressing and butter. What wasn’t so excited to discover was just how much junk and allergens are lurking in even the most unsuspecting items.

I always thought that the reason airplane food made me feel so terrible was because it was loaded with salt and other nastiness to make it taste good since our sense of taste isn’t as sharp while several thousands of feet up in the air (see the reasons why in this article). While this certainly contributed to my discomfort, the real reason was because I was eating all sorts of allergens! Following this, I started preparing all of my own foods for flights so that I could land ready to explore instead of curling up in bed sick for the first day of a trip.

Here’s how I break things down:

  • East Coast/Ohio/Montreal, 1-3 hours = no food, one small bottle of water; snack before departure at airport and meal once we land
  • West Coast/Hawaii, 5-12 hours = one-two meals and one snack, one large bottle of water and one bottle Pellegrino
  • Europe, 6-8 hours = one meal and one snack, one large bottle of water and one bottle Pellegrino
  • Asia, too long = a lot of food, several waters

NY/NJ airports have made finding a suitable snack much easier recently thanks to newly constructed “gourmet” options. Instead of grab and go places with only chips and sandwiches, it’s now possible to find simple dried fruits, clean popcorns and other chip replacement options and packs of nuts. If you have the time to sit down for a meal, many of the terminal restaurants are now serving decent salads and simple grilled dishes as well (though I almost always go for a bowl of french fries…).

So, what should you pack for your meals and snacks? Aim for foods that can go several hours without refrigeration or don’t need refrigeration at all. Put it all together in a lunch tote inside your carryon extra item/purse (I use a beach bag sized tote that holds my purse and lunch bag) along with napkins. You can get plastic utensils and your waters from the terminal after security.

  • apples, oranges, bananas – fruits with thicker skins that can be easily peeled or eaten without being crushed
  • baggie of almonds, walnuts, cashews – whatever nut is your favorite to snack on
  • prosciutto and other cured meats (some cured meats use dairy so be careful)
  • pieces of parmesan or cheddar cheese (if not allergic)
  • homemade or store-bought granola/breakfast bars
  • grain salad with fresh and roasted veggies, dressed just before leaving the house
  • pasta salad or pasta with simple red sauce
  • chocolate bar (can’t skip dessert!)
  • tea bags (because I’m super particular about tea)

Packing for the way back home is much more difficult since you normally won’t have a kitchen to cook/prep in. I try to go to a deli or grocery store for a few items, like a banana and nuts. I usually avoid prepared foods because they don’t sit well with me even if they are totally allergy friendly. I think there is either cross-contamination or they sit too long and start to grow bacteria, who knows.

Let’s say you only need to avoid one or two allergens. Many airlines now offer specialty meals such as gluten-free, vegetarian and vegan in addition to Kosher options. On flights to specific countries you can also find other religious-conscious meals such as Muslim, Jain and Hindu vegetarian. If these suit you and you’re happy eating airline food then go for it! It’s certainly much easier and less hassle.

If you’re traveling with a peanut or treenut allergy, be aware that not all airlines will be very kind to you. I’ve heard horror stories from friends of being kicked off planes (pilot did not want the responsibility of a potential allergic reaction mid-flight), being embarrassed by flight attendants who point them out and blame them for the lack of a snack during flight, and whose requests get ignored even though they’ve emailed the airline far in advance. Some airlines create “nut-free buffer zones” where those within the rows immediately before or after you have agreed not to consume nuts during the flight. United doesn’t serve peanuts but does serve treenuts and items that may contain trace amounts of peanuts due to being manufactured on the same equipment; they do not create buffer zones and they do not allow you to pre-board in order to wipe down your area.

In the past month I’ve had back to back trips: first to France then Hawaii. Both trips I packed food for which inspired me to write this post. Below is what I packed for each destination.

France – I only packed a snack of banana and almonds and a few chocolate bars to savor over the trip (have you ever heard of a vegan French pastry?!?!) since I took an overnight flight. I had some french fries at the airport before I boarded, took an Advil PM, passed out for 90% of the flight, woke up and had a my snack. The return flight was another story: I had a handful of almonds left and bought a piece of chocolate that I thought was more rice cake dipped in chocolate than straight dark chocolate. Forgetting that the airport in Paris is nothing like our airports, I only got a few waters and a bag of chips before going through security and into the land of no food (or at least allergy-friendly food). I had eaten the almonds and chips before takeoff because I had no breakfast and it was lunchtime and I was STARVING. I couldn’t eat a single item they served, and they had no fruit or small snacks on the plane *that they would admit to me* so I ate my piece of chocolate as slowly as possible and then gorged myself on the largest bowl of pasta ever when I got home. It was so good I almost cried. Hungry Kelley = absolute monster.

Hawaii – I knew going in that this flight was going to be a nightmare and was totally prepared. Since it is a domestic flight, the airlines can get away without serving any meals even though it is 10+ hours. We left at 8am EST and landed at 2:30pm in Hawaii – missing both breakfast and lunch. I pity the poor souls who weren’t prepared and starved on this flight. Here’s what I packed:

I wasn’t nearly as worried about the return since it was an overnight flight and I would sleep for a good portion of it. We left around 3:00pm and landed at 6:00am EST, missing just dinner. We stopped at a Dean and Deluca in Waikiki and got bean salad and a quinoa salad. I also had one remaining bag of almonds and a bag of waffle chips. We boarded, ordered some wine, ate, watched a movie, and then slept the rest of the flight.

I wasn’t thrilled with how the blueberry quinoa breakfast bars turned out so I’m not sharing the recipe. They looked good but were really crumbly and the flavor wasn’t quite right.

For the salad, just cook up some farro and lentils according to their packaging. Add in whatever veggies you want on top: radish, carrot, celery, cucumber, tomato, asparagus, peas, etc. I added radish, peas, tomato, chickpeas, walnuts and roasted asparagus this time. Top it off with a doss of lemon dressing: 2 Tbsp fresh lemon juiced whisked together with 8 Tbsp evoo until it is fully emulsified. I add little to no salt – I already get puffy enough from flying, I don’t need extra salt to help me out!

While food allergies definitely make planning and preparing for trips more difficult, you don’t need to suffer. I hope this helps those of you with allergies or traveling with someone with allergies. If you have any questions or want suggestions on what and how to pack, don’t hesitate to reach out to me!

Safe travels!!

 

Yeast-free Vegan Flatbread

Yeast-free Vegan Flatbread

This 4-ingredient take on flatbread is a perfect yeast-free substitute for traditional wraps, breads, pitas and more.

Vibrant Beet Hummus

Vibrant Beet Hummus

This vibrant pink beet hummus is a great healthy snack loaded with health benefits and flavor. And it’s easy to make!

Celebration, Florida

Celebration, Florida

Happy May and Happy Allergy Awareness Month! I have been getting pummeled by allergies since we were in Florida a few weeks ago. I heard recently that “pollen season” in NYC is at it’s worst in history, and we won’t get a break until winter basically. Yippee!  I foresee several Benadryl comas in my future….

In April we spent time in Celebration, Florida. We usually spend a few weekends there every year visiting Scott’s parents and grandparents. This year we went down for Easter and my birthday then extended the trip so I’d get to see my sister march at Disney World later in the week.

Celebration feels like a quaint little town, even though it is actually rather big. The houses are picture perfect thanks to strict color and design standards, everyone says hello and waves to each other on the streets, the town center is walking distance and is always lively between lunch-goers, the after-school Starbucks crowd, and evening activities, and it is close to so many major parks and attractions. It’s basically a slice of Americana. Of course, since it’s an Orlando suburb, there is Orlando traffic to deal with if you want to go to a major shopping mall, the outlets or one of the theme parks, but other than that it is a relaxing, sunny and happy place to be.

While the town center has several restaurants, not all are worth eating at. And because we were staying for 10 days, I decided to do a full grocery run to buy Kelley friendly foods to cook throughout our stay. We still went out to eat a few times, though. There are two places in town that we rarely stray from: Celebration Town Tavern, serving traditional American food with Boston flare, and Cafe D’Antonio, serving Italian food.

Celebration Town Tavern is great for a few reasons:

  • It has a large covered outdoor area with a bar, perfect for watching sports while having a drink
  • There is also a large covered dining area dedicated to those with dogs
  • The food is consistently good

Our waiter was excellent and very attentive to my allergies. The chef sent him back out to ask about cross contamination concerns because they use one fryer for all their fried foods including my beloved french fries and hated shellfish. Funny enough, only a few other chefs have ever raised this concern so I said, let’s try it! We’ll find out if it’s an issue. Now, I know this is a horrible idea and I really do not suggest anyone with food allergies be so risky. I only did it because I know I’ve had french fries in the past that have been in a contaminated fryer and I’ve never reacted.

Everything turned out well on this occasion: I had a plain burger, no bun, and a side of fries for lunch, and I felt fine afterwards. We went back a few afternoons to watch the Indians and Cavs play (Go Cleveland!) and each time I had an order of fries with no reaction.

Our other restaurant staple is Cafe D’Antonio. While this is my favorite in Celebration, it is not always the best with allergies, which I put on the waiters, not the chef. On this trip we went to Cafe D’Antonio on two occasions: once as a family and once just Scott and me. When we went with my in-laws, we were welcomed and treated differently because they know them. The waitress diligently wrote down all of my allergies, checked with the chef that my order could be prepared allergen free, and reported back to me before placing the order. I felt completely taken care of and had no worries about my food.

I had the Capellini d’Angelo without parmesan and shared the peas and prosciutto with Scott, made with olive oil instead of butter. The meal was delicious and filling and I felt good afterwards.

The second time we went, just Scott and I, we were welcomed and seated immediately. Our waiter was friendly but kind of brushed off my allergies, saying he was allergic to shellfish also so he knew what it was like and would make sure all of my food was OK. But, he didn’t want to hear any of my allergies and didn’t write them down when I listed them. He was falsely over-confident because we shared an allergy threat, usually the opposite of how someone who shares food allergies reacts. I was a little worried but figured all would be fine.

I ordered Pappardelle Bolognese and happily saw that the pasta that came out was penne, substituted for the fresh pappardelle to avoid the egg allergen. This put me at ease and I went to town, hungry after all day in the sun walking around Disney. By the time we left the restaurant my stomach hurt so badly I could barely stand up straight. I will never know exactly what caused the reaction but I figure there was dairy or yeast of some sort in the sauce.

I had one other food encounter on this trip that didn’t turn out well. I had never heard of Dole Whip before so my mother-in-law took me to the Polynesian at Disney to try it for the first time. As I understand it, until 2014 the only place Dole Whip was served was at a stand inside of Magic Kingdom, which explains why the legend of Dole Whip had alluded me. We looked up the ingredients online, some of which looked a little suspect to me, but decided this was something I clearly had to experience in life so I went for it. The pineapple soft serve is completely dairy-free, vegan and gluten-free. Here’s the scary part: the vanilla soft serve only has casein from dairy, just the protein, so not any actually milk…… If you have a dairy allergy you absolutely will be allergic to it but if you’re lactose intolerant, you will be fine.

Anyway, we went, we ate (just the pineapple for me), I understood the glory that is Dole Whip, and then I paid the price. Scott tucked me into bed early (like 9pm early) and I watched Netflix until I fell asleep, deciding that I would come up with my own version of Dole Whip at home. I haven’t started experimenting yet but I will soon!

My absolute favorite thing to do while we are in Celebration is to go to the Ritz-Carlton Orlando Spa for some pampering, pool-side rays and the best healthy food at Vitale, the spa cafe, by the most lovely and friendly chef I’ve ever met, Chef Mirtha. I was spoiled and went twice on this trip: once for my birthday and again as a family day where we all got pedicures together, even the men!

The spa uses a few different lines of products, from all natural to more chemically enhanced lotions and serums. I went through my allergies with my aesthetician and she was able to come up with a mixture of products that made my skin look and feel great without any reactions.

But the real reason to go to the spa is so that you can lounge poolside for the day. Since the spa pool is only accessible to those who have booked a treatment or bought a spa pass, the pool is quiet and relaxing. The first day we went we were some of the only people there but the second day it was a bit more packed since it was the weekend. Thankfully the spa manager set us up with a cabana so even though there were a lot of people sunbathing, we felt like we were in our own little paradise.

The spa cafe, Vitale, serves their full menu poolside. On our first trip there I mentioned to our server that I had allergies and, instead of trying to wade through the menu himself, he sent out the chef to speak about preparing a custom meal. Chef Mirtha was extremely knowledgable and more than happy to personally cook and prepare a meal for me. After walking through the list, she suggested a simple grilled chicken salad loaded with veggies and topped with a honey-lime emulsion. She even brought the prepared dish out to me herself to make sure everything was OK.

I do not know what she did to this chicken while it was grilling but it was the juiciest, most delicious piece of grilled chicken I’ve ever had. Needless to say, when we returned later in the week I requested the salad again and shortly thereafter Chef Mirtha appeared with another outstanding dish. To top it off, she prepared a plate of dairy- and soy-free chocolate covered strawberries for me so that I could enjoy dessert with everyone else.

I also took the opportunity to try the new(ish) Moët Ice Imperial, the first champagne made to be enjoyed on ice. My expectations were really low; I figured it would be flat and overly sweet. To my surprise, it was actually delicious and extremely refreshing on a hot day. But that’s where the issue came in: it disappeared really quickly as in I couldn’t stop drinking it because it was like alcoholic flavored seltzer. Would I buy a bottle for myself? No. I would drink it on the beach if someone else brought it, though.

The rest of our trip was spent relaxing/working at the house and at the parks. While we usually do not go to Disney or Universal, on this trip we did both. I was pleasantly surprised to discover that both parks have strict allergy and dietary standards, which I’ll talk about in another post. The good news is, I was able to eat at both without any problems.

I’ll leave you with a few more photos from this trip including a two friendly kitties that live around the neighborhood and like to visit with you on walks.

Stay tuned for part 2: Eating at Universal and Disney.

 

Very Blueberry Pie and Dairy-free Pie Dough

Very Blueberry Pie and Dairy-free Pie Dough

This dairy-, egg- and soy-free blueberry pie is perfect for a summer picnic.

Chocolate Chocolate Chip Cookies

Chocolate Chocolate Chip Cookies

Flourless, super chocolatey vegan cookies to satisfy your sweet tooth.

Rich and Hearty Lamb Ragu

Rich and Hearty Lamb Ragu

Last week I was standing in the meat section at Whole Foods, thinking to myself “I cannot have chicken again tonight,” when a package of lamb stew pieces caught my eye. I had never cooked lamb before but hey, it was Thursday – red wine and Scandal night – and it couldn’t be that hard, so I grabbed it and some other items to make a warming, rich and hearty ragu perfect for a cold day and a bottle of red wine.

I’m a big fan of ragu, doesn’t matter what kind really. But recently I discovered, thanks to a very attentive and allergy-knowledgable waiter, that many ragu recipes, especially those you’ll find at restaurants, contain MILK! Quelle horreur! As it was explained to me, the milk helps bring out the richness of the meat to enhance the overall flavor of the dish. Blah, blah – all I heard was “you’ve been slowly killing yourself” while I realized why I came home from restaurants with stomach aches that lasted for days. (I’m not dramatic at all…)

Now I’m sure any trained chef would laugh at me not knowing this. Growing up, my mom’s ragus never had milk and all of the recipes I’ve tried over the years have not called for milk, so I’m going to ask for a pass on this one. Afterall, I’m definitely not a master chef.

My ragu does not have any dairy in it and yet it is still rich, meaty, tomato-ey and very satisfying. It is the perfect meal when you need some comfort food or  when you’re just sick of basic everyday recipes. It has just 9 ingredients (plus salt and pepper, of course) is allergy-friendly, and is very easy to make. Just make sure to start several hours before you need to eat.

A note on canned tomatoes: As with all food, the less processed, the better, and canned tomatoes are no exception. Many recipes call for diced or crushed canned tomatoes but with each step past whole peeled tomatoes there are more processes and additives to get to the end result. In my recipes, I always use whole peeled tomatoes, with as few other ingredients as possible, and cut them or hand crush them to the size they need to be. This will add maybe 5 minutes to your prep time but it is worth it! Also, hand crushing tomatoes is really cathartic and fun.

The Fresh Direct brand is the best I’ve found for whole peeled tomatoes.  There are just two ingredients: tomatoes and tomato juice (shocking!). Most other brands contain citric acid, naturally or chemically derived, which is an allergy red flag for me. To make chemically derived citric acid, simple carbohydrates are fed to a specific strain of mold to produce the fermented compound that is citric acid. Gross, no thanks. While some say this should not trigger mold allergies, for me it absolutely does. Most brands also contain salt or calcium chloride in varying amounts.

To prep the meat, pat it dry with paper towels, then generously season with salt and pepper. Patting your meat dry may seem like a bother and waste of time but to get a proper sear your meat cannot have extra moisture. Don’t worry, the lamb will cook long enough in the tomato and wine sauce to become tender and juicy and amazing.

Once you have all your ingredients prepped, heat a dutch oven on the stove and sear the meat in olive oil. You want a nice dark crust on each side which will take some time, probably about 10 minutes or so. If you have too many pieces to do this all at once, take your time and sear in two rounds. The more crowded the pot, the less your meat will sear and the more it will steam cook.

If you’ve cooked the lamb in two batches, put it all back into the pot, reduce the heat and add the onions, cooking for 8-10 minutes. Then add in the garlic, carrots, sage and rosemary and cook until soft, about another 5 minutes.

Pour in the wine (and pour yourself a glass because you deserve it!), cooking until the liquid has reduced by half. Crush the tomatoes, with your hands or with a fork/potato masher, and add to the pot along with their juices. Cook for 5 minutes then cover and place in the oven.

You’re basically done! Kick back with your wine and a book while your dinner cooks.  The longer this cooks the more tender and flavorful it will be. Leave it in the oven for at least 3 hours and up to 5 hours if you have the time and patience. You may think you have the patience but just wait until the smells permeate your house….

Ah, you made it. Some lamb pieces may have already fallen apart but others will need a little help. Take your spoon and gently break the remaining pieces apart. It won’t take much effort. Stir it all up and serve it over pasta, rice, mashed potatoes, polenta, quinoa, you get the idea. Hopefully you still have a glass of wine left to enjoy with it! Bon appétit!

If you make this recipe, post a picture on Instagram and tag me! #champagneandfrites

Rich and Hearty Lamb Ragu
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Slow cooked until fall apart tender, this rich lamb ragu is dairy-free, allergy friendly and sure to satisfy.
Author:
Recipe type: Dinner
Serves: 4
Ingredients
  • 1 pound lamb stew pieces
  • 1 medium onion, roughly chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 2-3 medium carrots, peeled and cut into rounds
  • 3 sprigs fresh rosemary, de-stemmed and chopped
  • 3 fresh sage leaves, chopped
  • olive oil
  • salt and fresh black pepper
  • 1 cup wine
  • 1 28-oz can peeled whole tomatoes
Instructions
  1. Preheat the oven to 275.
  2. Clean the lamb pieces and pat dry with a paper towel. Season generously with salt and pepper then set aside while you prepare the rest of the ingredients.
  3. Heat an oven-proof Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add enough olive oil to coat the bottom of the pot then add the lamb and brown, about 10 minutes. If you have too many pieces to fit into the pot then do this step in two batches.
  4. When the meat is browned, lower the heat to medium and add in the onions. Cook, stirring occasionally, until transparent, 8-10 minutes. Lower the heat to medium-low and add the garlic, carrots, rosemary and sage, cooking for 5 minutes until carrots are soft.
  5. Pour in the wine and simmer until the liquid is reduced by half.
  6. While the wine is reducing, crush the tomatoes by hand, over the can to save the juices, or with a fork. Once the wine has reduced, add ¾ of the crushed tomatoes and juices to the pot, simmer, cover and place the pot into the oven for 3-5 hours.
  7. Remove the pot from the oven and shred any remaining chunks of meat with a spoon. Season with salt and pepper, if needed.
  8. Serve over pasta, mashed potatoes, or your choice of grain.

 

Vegan Chocolate Cupcakes

Vegan Chocolate Cupcakes

These vegan chocolate cupcakes may be better than “real” chocolate cupcakes. Best of all, they are allergy friendly and take less than an hour to make.